What Would It Take to Make a Good Video Game Movie?

I’ll happily admit to being a fairly casual gamer. I don’t have a console, I’m not the first person in line at GameStop when a new title is released, and I typically idle the minutes and hours away with mindless entertainment like Angry Birds on my phone.

That being said, there are a couple of more ‘serious’ games I enjoy playing from time to time; particularly ID Software’s titles such as Doom and Quake (I’ve been playing those games since the late ’90s), and one of my all-time favorite PC games back in the day was Max Payne, mainly because of the heavy emphasis on plot and storytelling. I recently finished playing through Doom (2016), and although the story was minimal the combat mechanics were fun, and the whole 15+ hours of gameplay were hugely entertaining.

Sometimes, though, I want the experience of a solid video game without the effort of having to, you know, actually play it. I guess I’m not the only one to think this, because throughout the years there have been endless adaptations of video games to film. Sadly, most of these have met with spectacular failure, both at the box office and critically. This led me to wonder: why are so many video game adaptations terrible, and what might it take to make one that is actually good?

Strong Source Material

The original Macintosh FPS, Marathon, was exceptionally plot-centric.

Not all video games are created equal. Whilst early PC titles such as Quake, Doom, Myst and others may have broken boundaries in terms of 3D graphics, gameplay mechanics and multiplayer options, most of them were pretty thin on plot. It was mostly just find the bad guy, kill the bad guy, repeat. There were some exceptions to this; I recall playing a early Bungie-developed game called Marathon, which not only was groundbreaking from a physics modeling perspective and introduced LAN-based multiplayer, but also because the plot featured so heavily in the game that certain levels were impossible to complete unless you interacted with the story.

It wasn’t until I played Max Payne in the early ’00s, however, that I realized just how strong a video game story could be. With graphic novel-inspired cutscenes and a strong emphasis on character development, I ended up playing the game through dozens of times just to relive the story.

It stands to reason, then, that in order to make a successful adaptation, you need something to adapt in the first place. A strong plot and compelling characters are necessary for any story, and unfortunately, many video games lack these elements.

An Understanding of Adaptations

One of the biggest points of contention when a non-filmic source material is adapted to film is the authenticity of the writers’ efforts to maintain what was in the original story. Take Peter Jackson’s efforts with The Lord of the Rings: to many, it represents a masterpiece of western cinema, and a fitting adaptation to an equally timeless and epic set of books. To others, however, Jackson took too many liberties with the source material, from omitting characters to changing plot devices, and even creating scenarios that never occurred in the books at all.

In the books, Narsil was reforged right at the beginning; in the movies, not until the end.

However, I believe the critics of these films are missing the point of an adaptation. It isn’t meant to faithfully replicate every scene in the book on celluloid; to do so would be uninventive, slow-paced, and frankly boring. An adaptation should take the core, central elements of a story and rework them into the new format – that being a 2-3 hour film that you sit and watch. If that means changing characters, motivations and plot points, then so be it – it’s an adaptation, not a replication.

I think that this balance is something many video game adaptations miss the boat on. In some cases, they try too hard to match the original material, and in others they deviate too far from it. Sometimes they pander too heavily to the fans, and in others they try too hard to make it accessible to people who’ve never experienced the original game. There’s a fine line between these two extremes, and a successful adaptation should be able to satisfy the original players’ desire for familiarity, whilst creating a world that can be experienced easily by someone who’s never heard of it before.

A Strong Cast

This is probably more essential for films in general, but it’s just as relevant for video game adaptations as it is for any other type of movie. A strong cast is vital to the success of a movie, because as viewers we need to feel invested in the characters, their motivations and relationships, and the chemistry between them is important.

The chemistry between these characters was unmistakable.

Now this doesn’t mean the cast need to necessarily be famous or well-known; perhaps one of the best examples of chemistry in film is the original Star Wars from 1977; no one knew who Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher or Harrison Ford were at the time, but their on-screen chemistry is what arguably makes the movie. Compare this to the lackluster connection between Hayden Christensen and Natalie Portman in the prequels; it didn’t matter that Portman was arguably more up-and-coming at the time, because they simply didn’t seem to have any real connection.

There are examples of video game adaptations that bagged well-known actors and yet failed on the chemistry; Doom (2005) has both Karl Urban and Rosamund Pike (the latter of which would go on to nominated for an Oscar), but the relationship between them as brother and sister falls flat at every turn. This is in part due to a failure to develop the relationship through the plot (the two share almost no screen time), but also because the two actors just don’t seem to ‘click’.

Homage to the Original Game

Certain games are known for inventing, developing, or innovating certain types of gameplay features. Doom brought us the BFG – a massively overpowered weapon that can decimate almost any enemy in a single shot; Max Payne was one of the first games to introduce ‘bullet time’ – a feature where gameplay slows down during battle sequences, allowing the player to see individual bullets flying past. And there are movies where these concepts are adapted well, of course – and others where they aren’t.

In the 2008 adaptation of Max Payne, we see Mark Wahlberg make his way through a very noir New York city – just as in the original game – but the limited use of bullet time was frustrating. This was one of the cornerstones of the game, and although it features at certain points in the film, it never felt like it was as important an aspect as it should have been. There are other aspects of the original game that were modified as well, including some of the key character motivations and climactic scenes.

The first-person sequence was one of Doom’s best assets.

On the flip side, a film that I felt did this well was, again, Doom (2005). Not only did it bring us the BFG in a way that could never have been done in a game (when fired, it takes out massive chunks of wall and ceiling, a mechanic that would be exceptionally difficult to recreate in a game), but it also boasts an incredible first-person scene that bears all the classic hallmarks of a FPS game, including using multiple weapons to defeat multiple demons in a non-stop, long-take action sequence.

Not all video game movies are bad, and not all are as bad as some people make them out to be. That being said, the highest-rated game adaptation on Rotten Tomatoes is Angry Birds 2, and it holds a he level of something like say, John Wick (83%, 89% and 90% for each film respectively), which bears all the hallmarks of a video game movie without actually being one.

I think the key thing is a successful blend of many of the smaller elements that work in various movies – faithfulness, strong casting choices, and an understanding of how to make a good adaptation. Who knows? Perhaps one day we’ll see a game adaptation that truly checks all the boxes, and I know I’ll be first in line to see it when it does come out!

Author Spotlight: John Fedorka

Each day this week, I’m going to be highlighting the work of a fellow author in conjunction with the release of my new book, The Redemption of Erâth: Ancients & Death. The support of readers like you makes a huge difference to the lives of small, independent authors, and whether you buy our books, buy us a cup of coffee, or just say hello, it all goes towards building the universe of literature that keeps you going!

The Redemption of Erâth is an ongoing fantasy series chronicling the journey of Brandyé and his friend Elven through the fantastic and dark world of Erâth, in an effort to save their world from the overriding forces of Darkness. Volumes 1 & 2 are on sale for $0.99, and the third, Ancients & Death, is now available through Kindle and Apple Books.

Today’s author spotlight focuses on John Fedorka, whose The Last Elf series tells the tale of Chork, the last elf born, who rejects his prophesied destiny and yet falls into a world of magic and dark machinations all  the same. John has been writing for most of his life in various aspects, and turned his attention to fantasy since 2016.

John – who are you, and what do you write?

John Fedorka, epic fantasy, The Last Elf series.

When did you start writing, and what inspired you?

I wanted to be a writer since I first learned to read. Though I worked in newspapers and public relations for half my life, it took me 63 years before I began working on my first novel, The Last Born.

Do you have a favorite line that you’ve written? If so, what is it?

There are too many, most of which have not been published.

What do you hope people will get out of your writing? Is there a message or moral, or do you just hope readers have fun with it?

Entertainment. Sometimes, the journey is [more] important than the destination.

We all know writers love to drink – coffee, tea or worse! When you’re writing, what’s your poison?

Coffee, HEB orange soda. Red wine before my surgery.

What would you say you are most known for amongst your friends and family?

Warped sense of humor, creativity, imagination.

With so many big-screen (and small-screen) adaptations of novels recently, what would you say your favorite book to movie adaptation is?

Tolkien’s trilogy.

To follow on from that, do you think there’s a movie out there that’s actually better than the book?

I’m sure there is, but I haven’t seen it. They are two different forms of communication. I believe it’s unfair to make the comparison.

What makes your work stand out from the crowd? What would someone find in reading your writing that they might not find elsewhere?

In this genre, a simple story told simply. How’s that for a trite answer? A panoply of supporting characters. Every character in my work is based on a character I have met in real life.

Think carefully. If someone were to make a movie based on your life, what would the title be – and who would play you?

Lost Opportunities – Robert Downey Jr.

 

You can learn more about him and his work at www.amazon.com/John-Fedorka/e/B076BRNJ3C/, and his books are available for purchase from Amazon.

Author Spotlight: J.E. Mueller

Each day this week, I’m going to be highlighting the work of a fellow author in conjunction with the release of my new book, The Redemption of Erâth: Ancients & Death. The support of readers like you makes a huge difference to the lives of small, independent authors, and whether you buy our books, buy us a cup of coffee, or just say hello, it all goes towards building the universe of literature that keeps you going!

The Redemption of Erâth is an ongoing fantasy series chronicling the journey of Brandyé and his friend Elven through the fantastic and dark world of Erâth, in an effort to save their world from the overriding forces of Darkness. Volumes 1 & 2 are on sale for $0.99, and the third, Ancients & Death, is now available through Kindle and Apple Books.

Today’s spotlight features an author who works in the fantastical realm of fantasy and fairytale, and has published three books (two in the same universe): J.E. Mueller. These include books 1 & 2 in the Shaudrey Universe series, Fire’s Song and Spirit’s Lullaby, as well as a modern retelling of Cinderella called An Unexpected Brew.

J.E. Mueller is known as the storyteller among her friends. Telling tales and weaving plots was always second nature for Mueller growing up. After college Mueller decided to go from telling and dabbling in plots to actually getting a novel out there in the world. After many cups of coffee later, and several dead red pens, there was success.

Aside from writing, the author also enjoys reading a wide variety of books and has even joined in helping others with the writing process by alpha and beta reading. When not part of the written world, Mueller can also be found playing action/adventure games, RPGs, sandbox, and nonsense games. Some of her favorites include. Skyrim, Alice: Madness Returns, Splatoon, Fat Princess, Stardew Valley, and the Legend of Zelda series.

You can learn more about her and her work at facebook.com/authorJEMueller/, and her books are available for purchase from Amazon.